Affordable Email Lists and Domains since 2000
  Account Logins We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover, American Express, PayPal, and Business Checks
Get Help
Check Mail
Home
Affordable Email Lists and Domains since 2000
Affordable Email Lists and Domains since 2000
IMail® List Service  |  LISTSERV® List Service  |  Domains & Secure Certificates
Affordable Email Lists and Domains since 2000
Affordable Email Lists and Domains since 2000
HELP
Affordable Email Lists and Domains since 2000
Contact
Customer
Support

Extreme Support What makes
our Support
Extreme?
Customer Testimonials What our
customers
are saying
about us
Uptime Guarantee Your service stays
up or we pay
you for the
downtime!

 GLOSSARY  OF  TERMS

Email, List, Hosting, and other Web-Related Terms
1-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1-9
24/7 Network Monitoring
Our network technicians work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week monitoring the web servers that host your web site, ensuring that your site is always online.
99.9% Uptime Guarantee
Although unscheduled downtime is rare, if and when it does occur, you may be entitled to receive credit to compensate you for the amount of time services were unavailable. For specifics, please see our Service Agreement.
A
Above the Fold
The top part of an email message that is visible to the recipient without the need for scrolling. The term originally comes from print and refers to the top half of a folded newspaper.
Active Server Pages (ASP and ASP.net)
A server-side scripting technology by Microsoft that can be used to create dynamic and interactive web applications. An ASP page is an HTML page that contains server-side scripts that are processed by a web server before being sent to the user's browser. You can combine ASP with Extensible Markup Language (XML) and Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) to create powerful interactive websites. [ASP.net info]
Ad Server
An ad server allows you to place rotating banner advertisements on your website, manage your advertising clients, and to collect statistics on banner views and click throughs.
Alias
A unique and usually shorter URL (link) that can be distinguished from other links even if they ultimately go to the same Web page. This makes it possible to track which message led viewers to click on the link.
Alternative Domain Names
Alternative (New.New) domain extensions are accessible only by people that use one of many New.Net partner ISPs to access the Internet or by those who install a browser software plug-in provided by New.Net.
More than 174 million Internet users currently have access to these domain extensions. For more information about New.Net domain extensions, please check the New.Net FAQ.
New.Net extensions are NOT sanctioned by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and New.Net domains are not universally resolvable.
Application Service Provider
A company that offers organizations access over the Internet to applications and related services that would otherwise have to be located on site at the organization's premises.
ASP and ASP.net (Active Server Pages)
A server-side scripting technology by Microsoft that can be used to create dynamic and interactive web applications. An ASP page is an HTML page that contains server-side scripts that are processed by a web server before being sent to the user's browser. You can combine ASP with Extensible Markup Language (XML) and Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) to create powerful interactive websites. [ASP.net info]
Attachment
A file that is attached to an email message, often an image file (photo) or document.
Autoresponder
A computer program that automatically responds with a prewritten message to anyone who sends an email message to a particular email address or uses an online feedback form.
Authentication
A term that refers to standards, such as Sender ID, SPF and DomainKeys/DKIM, that serve to identify that an email is really sent from the domain name and individual listed as the sender. Authentication standards are used to fight spam and spoofing.
B
B2B (Business-to-Business)
The exchange of information, products or services between two businesses – as opposed to between a business and a consumer (B2C).
B2C (Business-to-Consumer)
The exchange of information, products or services between a business and a consumer – as opposed to between two businesses (B2B).
Back-end
(1) The part of the computer that changes source code into object code (machine read code). (2) The part of the program that runs on a server in a client/server application.
Bayesian filter
A spam filter that evaluates email message content to determine the probability that it is spam. Bayesian filters are adaptable and can learn to identify new patterns of spam by analyzing incoming email.
BITNET ("Because It's Time Network")
BITNET is primarily a network of sites for educational purpose and is separate from the Internet. Email is exchanged at no charge between BITNET and the Internet.
Blacklist
A list containing email addresses or IP addresses of suspected spammers. Blacklists are sometimes used to reject incoming mail at the server level before the email reaches the recipient.
Block
An action by an Internet Service Provider to prevent email messages from being forwarded to the end recipient.
Bounces
Email messages that fail to reach their intended destination. "Hard" bounces are caused by invalid email addresses, whereas "soft" bounces are due to temporary conditions, such as full mailboxes.
C
CGI (Common Gateway Interface)
A specification for transferring information between a Web server and a CGI program. CGI programs are often used for processing email subscriptions and Web forms.
CGI-BIN
This is an interface standard which provides a method of executing a server-side program (script) from a website to generate a web page with dynamic content. Scripts conforming to this standard may be written in any programming language that produces an executable file, but are most often written in Perl, Python, C, C++, or TCL.
Challenge-Response
An authentication method that requires a human to respond to an email challenge message before the original email that triggered the challenge is delivered to the recipient. This method is sometimes used to cut down on spam since it requires an action by a human sender.
Chatterbox™ Instant Messenger Plus
Chatterbox™ is a chat room, discussion list, and instant messaging service, that allows users to send encrypted instant messages, have private conversations, and create and participate in private or public chat rooms and discussion lists. [Chatterbox Info] [Chatterbox Demo]
Click-through Rate
In an email marketing campaign, the percentage of recipients who clicked on a particular link within the email message.
Click-through Tracking
The process of tracking how many recipients clicked on a particular link in an email message. This is commonly done to measure the success of email marketing campaigns.
ColdFusion and ColdFusion MX
ColdFusion is a complete web application server for developing and delivering scalable e-business applications. [ColdFusion MX Info]
Common Gateway Interface (CGI)
A specification for transferring information between a Web server and a CGI program. CGI programs are often used for processing email subscriptions and Web forms.
Conditional Blocks
A text fragment that is pasted into an email message only if certain conditions are met (for instance the recipient lives in a certain area). Conditional blocks allow email marketers to create more personalized mailings.
Conversion Rate
A measure of success for an email marketing campaign (for instance the number of recipients who completed a purchase). With email marketing, conversion rates are relatively easy to calculate because of the technology's measurable nature.
Country Code Top-Level Domains (ccTLDs)
Country-code domains were intended for use by individual countries. They include the following: .EU, .LA, .TV, .US, .CO, and .CC. [Complete list of ccTLDs]
ccTLDs are sanctioned by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and are universally resolvable.
CPM (Cost Per Thousand)
An industry standard measure for ad impressions. Email has a relatively low CPM compared to other marketing channels (Note: "M" represents thousand in Roman numerology).
CRM (Customer Relationship Management)
The methodologies, software, and Internet capabilities that help a company manage customer relationships in an efficient and organized manner.
Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
The methodologies, software, and Internet capabilities that help a company manage customer relationships in an efficient and organized manner.
D
Data Transfer
Data transfer is the amount of data that is accessed by visitors to your site. An average web page is 15 KB to 20 KB in file size. The number of pages and the number of visitors you plan to have to your site will regulate how much data is transferred.
Deliverability
A term that refers to the best practices and authentication techniques of mass email communication that improve the likelihood that opt-in email messages are successfully delivered to end recipients instead of being erroneously blocked by ISPs and spam filters.
Discussion Group
An email list community where members can obtain and share information. Every member can write to the list, and in doing so, everyone subscribed to the list will receive a copy of the message.
DNS (Domain Name Server)
An Internet service that translates domain names into IP addresses.
DNS Lookup
The process of looking up and translating a domain name into its corresponding IP address. This can be compared to a Reverse DNS Lookup, which is the process of looking up and translating an IP address into a domain name.
Domain Cloaking (a/k/a URL Framing, URL Cloaking, or Domain Masking)
Allows you to redirect users to your existing web page while maintaining your domain name in the address bar of their browsers. Domain Cloaking works by placing your web site within a frame. It is used to hide the real address / domain, generally to make your domain name look more professional or be easier to remember. If you want search engines to list your site, you should avoid using Domain Cloaking. Due to abuse of the technique to optimize for search engine spiders, many search engines will refuse to list or delist cloaked sites.
Domain Forwarding (a/k/a URL Forwarding, Web Forwarding, or URL Redirection)
A technique on the world wide web for making a web page available under many URLs (links).
Domain Forwarding is a free service for customers who have registered their domain with us and are using our DNS service. A hidden "A" record subdomain, such as www.webhelps.com or hosting.webhelps.com is created pointing to our web server. When our web server gets a request for your subdomain from a visitor, it forwards the visitor to the URL (link) of your choice. You may create up to 50 subdomains for free. To create subdomains, login to your Domain Manager at http://access.enom.com using your WebHelps password.
Our Domain Forwarding service is very useful when attempting to generate traffic to another site already in place. For example, you registered a new, shorter domain name that you thought might be easier for users to remember than an existing website address you already have. With our Domain Forwarding service, visitors to your new domain name are automatically redirected to your old website and your old website's address is visible in the address bar of their web browser.
Domain Manager (a/k/a DNS Manager)
A DNS Manager allows the end-user to edit their domain’s zone file, including A (address) records, CNAME (canonical name) records and MX (mail exchange) records. Login to your Domain Manager at http://access.enom.com using your WebHelps password.
Domain Name
A name that identifies one or more IP addresses. Domain names always have at least two parts that are separated by dots (for instance webhelps.com). The part on the left is the second-level domain (more specific), while the part on the right is the top-level domain (more general).
Domain Name Server (DNS)
An Internet service that translates domain names into IP addresses.
DomainKeys/DKIM (DomainKeys/DomainKeys Identified Mail)
Cryptographic authentication solutions that add signatures to email messages, allowing recipient sites to verify that the message was sent by an authorized sender and was not altered in transit.
Domain Throttling
A technique that allows you to limit the number of email messages sent to a domain within a certain time frame. It is used to comply with ISPs and to avoid tripping spam filters. Many ISPs have their own policies and preferred limits.
Double Opt-in
The recommended procedure for subscribing email recipients to an email list or newsletter. Once a person requests to subscribe to a list, a confirmation email message is automatically sent to the supplied email address asking the person to verify that they have in fact requested to be included in future mailings.
Download
To transfer a copy of a file from an Internet server to one's own computer.
E
Email
Email allows you to send and receive text, HTML, images and other data files over the Internet. Email is one of the most popular online activities and has become a vital tool for electronic commerce.
Email Account
An Email Account is a physical mailbox on a server that can be accessed by a POP3 and/or IMAP mail client (computer email program) as well as WebMail. The amount of data (emails and attachments) the mailbox can hold is designated by the server administrator. All Email Accounts on a server will have a unique username and password.
Email Bounces
Email messages that fail to reach their intended destination. Hard bounces are caused by invalid email addresses, whereas soft bounces are due to temporary conditions, such as overloaded inboxes.
Email Client
Computer software used to read email. Microsoft Outlook, Outlook Express, Windows Mail, Windows Live Mail, Eudora, and Thunderbird are commonly-used clients.
Email Harvesting
The disreputable and often illegal practice of using an automated program to scan Web pages and collect email addresses for use by spammers.
Email Header
The section of an email message that contains the sender's and recipient's email addresses as well as the routing information.
Email Marketing
The use of email (or email lists) to plan and deliver permission-based marketing campaigns.
Email Storage/Space
Email storage or Email Space indicates the amount of storage available for email messages and attachments.
Extensible Markup Language (XML)
A flexible way to create standard information formats and share both the format and the data on the World Wide Web.
F
False Positive
A legitimate email message that is mistakenly rejected or filtered by a spam filter.
Favicon
Favicon is short for Favorites Icon. A favicon is an icon that displays in Internet Explorer address bars when visitors access your site.
Instructions: Create the 16x16 pixel image you want to display. Convert the image to an .ico file. An easy, free image editor with this capability is Irfanview. Name the file favicon.ico. Place the favicon.ico file in your web site's root directory. This is the web folder where your homepage (e.g. index.html, default.aspx) resides. Browsers will automatically look for a favicon.ico file in that location.
If you do not have access to your site's root directory, you can place favicon.ico in any directory, and add this HTML code to the <HEAD> tags of every page you want to display the favicon: <link rel="shortcut icon" href="/favicon.ico">. Change the href= path to the favicon in this code as needed.
You can use this method to display different favicons on different pages of your site. Simply create favicons with different names, then reference the favicon you want to display in the HEAD tags of the page.
File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
FTP is an Internet standard for transferring files over the Internet between two computers. FTP programs and utilities are used to upload and download web pages, graphics, and other files from your computer's hard drive to a remote web server which allows FTP access. When building a web site, one of these computers will be the web server on which the site's files are stored and the other will be your local computer where you create and/or maintain copies of site files. [FTP Instructions]
Forward DNS Lookup (DNS Lookup)
The process of looking up and translating a domain name into its corresponding IP address. This can be compared to a Reverse DNS Lookup, which is the process of looking up and translating an IP address into a domain name.
FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name)
A name consisting of both a host and a domain name. For example, www.webhelps.com is a fully qualified domain name. www is the host; webhelps is the second-level domain; and .com is the top-level domain.
Freeware
A free computer program usually made available on the Internet or through user groups.
Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN)
A name consisting of both a host and a domain name. For example, www.webhelps.com is a fully qualified domain name. www is the host; webhelps is the second-level domain; and .com is the top-level domain.
G
Generic Top-Level Domains
These are the most common gTLDs: .BIZ, .ORG, .NAME, .NET, .COM and .INFO.
Gateway
This is a hardware or software set-up that functions as a translator between two dissimilar protocols. A gateway can also be the term to describe any mechanism providing access to another system (e.g AOL might be called a gateway to the Internet).
H
Hard Bounces
Email messages that cannot be delivered to the recipient because of a permanent error, such as an invalid or non-existing email address.
Host
When a server acts as a host it means that other computers on the network do not have to download the software that this server carries. For instance, WebHelps offers the IMail® and LISTSERV® email list products, which customers can use without having to store the software on their own servers or computers.
Host Name
The name of a computer on the Internet (such as www.webhelps.com).
HTML (HyperText Markup Language)
The most commonly used coding language for creating Web pages. HTML can also be used in email messages.
HyperText Markup Language (HTML)
The most commonly used coding language for creating Web pages. HTML can also be used in email messages.
Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP)
A server-side scripting language. The PHP commands, which are embedded in the web page's HTML, are executed on the web server to generate dynamic HTML pages.
I
IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol)
A method of accessing email messages on a server without having to download them to your computer. (The opposite of POP3, which requires messages be downloaded for viewing.) [POP3/IMAP Quick Settings] [POP3/IMAP Comparison]
In-house List
A list of email addresses that a company has gathered through previous customer contacts, Web sign-ups or other permission-based methods. In-house lists typically generate higher conversion rates than rented lists.
Internet
The largest worldwide computer network.
Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP)
A method of accessing email messages on a server without having to download them to your computer. (The opposite of POP3, which requires messages be downloaded for viewing.) [POP3/IMAP Quick Settings] [POP3/IMAP Comparison]
Internet Protocol Address (IP Address)
A unique identifier for a computer on the Internet. It is written as four numbers separated by periods. Each number can range from 0 to 255. Before connecting to a computer over the Internet, a Domain Name Server translates the domain name into its corresponding IP address.
Internet Service Provider (ISP)
A company that provides access to the Internet, including the World Wide Web and email, typically for a monthly fee.
Intranet
A private network inside a company or organization.
IP Address (Internet Protocol Address)
A unique identifier for a computer on the Internet. It is written as four numbers separated by periods. Each number can range from 0 to 255. Before connecting to a computer over the Internet, a Domain Name Server translates the domain name into its corresponding IP address.
ISP (Internet Service Provider)
A company that provides access to the Internet, including the World Wide Web and email, typically for a monthly fee.
J
Java Server Page (JSP)
A technology for controlling the content or appearance of web pages through the use of servlets, small programs that are specified in the web page and run on the web server to modify the web page before it is sent to the user who requested it.
K
L
LAN (Local Area Network)
A computer network, although geographically limited, usually to the same building, office, etc.
Leave Mail On Server
Storing messages on a server is useful if you need to read mail from more than one computer. When you log on to your account from a different computer, your email program (e.g. Outlook Express) downloads messages according to the options you have set. With this mail feature, you can configure your computer's email program to "Leave a copy of messages on server."
List Broker
A company that sells or rents lists of email addresses. Some list brokers are not reputable and sell lists with unusable or unsubstantiated candidates. It is therefore advisable for email marketers to build their own internal lists.
List Owner
The owner of an email list is responsible for administrative matters.
LISTSERV®
L-Soft's email list management software and the first automated mailing list program created. LISTSERV allows users to create opt-in email lists, such as email newsletters, announcement lists and discussion groups.
Local Area Network (LAN)
A computer network, although geographically limited, usually to the same building, office, etc.
M
Mail-Merge:
A process that enables the delivery of personalized messages to large numbers of recipients. This is usually achieved using email list management software working in conjunction with a database.
Mainframe
A high-level computer often shared by multiple users connected by individual terminals.
Merge-Purge
The act of removing duplicate email addresses from a coalesced list that is composed of two or more existing lists.
MIME (Multi-Purpose Internet Mail Extensions)
An extension of the original Internet email standard that allows users to exchange text, audio or visual files.
Moderated List
Moderators must approve any message posted to an email list before it is delivered to all subscribers. It is also possible for the moderator to edit or delete messages.
MS ACCESS Database
An easy-to-use program for creating and maintaining databases. The ACCESS database driver for online databases is often supported by web hosts using the NT hosting platform.
MS SQL Database
Microsoft SQL has extensive database programming capabilities built on web standards. SQL provides enterprise-class data management with integrated business intelligence tools. The SQL database engine provides secure, reliable storage for both relational and structured data, enabling you to build and manage highly available, performant data applications. Rich XML and Internet standard support give you the ability to store and retrieve data in XML format easily with built-in stored procedures. You can also use XML updategrams to insert, update, and delete data easily.
MySQL Database
An Open Source database, designed for speed, power and precision in mission critical, heavy load use.
Multi-Purpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME)
An extension of the original Internet email standard that allows users to exchange text, audio or visual files.
N
O
ODBC (Open DataBase Connectivity)
A Microsoft standard for accessing different database systems from Windows, for instance Oracle or SQL.
Offload
To assume part of the processing demand from another device.
Open DataBase Connectivity (ODBC)
A Microsoft standard for accessing different database systems from Windows, for instance Oracle or SQL.
Open-relay
Open-relay is the third-party relaying of email messages though a mail server. Spammers looking to obscure or hide the source of large volume mailings often use mail servers with open-relays to deliver their email messages.
Open-up Rate
The percentage of recipients who opened their email messages. The open-up rate is often used to measure the success of an email marketing campaign.
Open-up Tracking
The process of tracking how many recipients opened their email messages as part of an email marketing campaign. Open-up tracking is only possible using HTML mail.
Operating System
A program that manages all other programs in a computer, such as Windows or Unix.
Opt-in
A type of email discussion or announcement list that requires people to explicitly subscribe in order to be included in distribution.
Opt-out
A type of email discussion or announcement list that subscribes people automatically, unless/until they specifically request not to be subscribed any longer. This method is not recommended and may in some cases be illegal.
Out-of-office Replies
Automatic email reply messages triggered by incoming email to a user's inbox, typically activated when users are on vacation or otherwise unavailable through email for an extended period.
Outsourcing
An arrangement where one company provides services to another company that would otherwise have been implemented in-house (See also ASP.
P
Pass-along
An email message that gets forwarded by a subscriber to another person who is not subscribed to the list (See also Viral Marketing).
PERL (Practical Extraction and Reporting Language)
A programming language often used for creating CGI programs.
Personalization
The insertion of personal greetings in email messages (for instance "Dear Jennifer" rather than the generic "Dear Customer"). Personalization requires email list management software that allows for mail-merge operations.
PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor)
A server-side scripting language. The PHP commands, which are embedded in the web page's HTML, are executed on the web server to generate dynamic HTML pages.
Plain Text
Text in an email message that contains no formatting elements. Plain Text is the recommended format for email discussion lists. More Info on Plain Text Sending
POP (Post Office Protocol)
A protocol used to retrieve email from a mail server. Most email clients use either the POP or the IMAP protocol.
POP3
POP3 requires users to download messages using an email program (e.g. Outlook Express) installed on their computer before reading them. (The opposite of IMAP, which allows users to access messages on the server.) [POP3/IMAP Quick Settings] [POP3/IMAP Comparison]
Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL)
A programming language often used for creating CGI programs.
Privacy
A major concern of Internet users that largely involves the sharing of personally identifiable information, which includes name, birth date, Social Security number and financial data, for example.
Protocol
The set of formal rules that describe how to transmit data, especially across a network of computers.
Q
Query
A subset of records in a database. Queries may be used to create highly specified demographics in order to maximize the effectiveness of an email marketing campaign.
R
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)
Data is transferred to disks by independent read and write operations. Instead of a dedicated parity disk, parity information is spread across all the drives. [more RAID info]
Real Audio and Video
Real Audio and Video is a client-server software system and file format(s) by Real Networks that allows Internet users to play audio and/or video-based multimedia content in real time as they are being downloaded (called "streaming media"), instead of the user having to download the complete file before being able to play it. [Real Audio/Video Information]
Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID)
Data is transferred to disks by independent read and write operations. Instead of a dedicated parity disk, parity information is spread across all the drives. [more RAID info]
Reverse DNS Lookup
A Reverse DNS Lookup is the process of looking up and translating an IP address into a domain name. This can be compared to a Forward DNS Lookup, which is the process of looking up and translating a domain name into its corresponding IP address.
Rich media
An Internet advertising term for a Web page that uses graphical technologies such as streaming video, audio files or other similar technology to create an interactive atmosphere with viewers.
Router (Routing System)
The role of a route can be described as a bridge between two or more networks. The function of the router is to look at the destination addresses of the packets passing through it, and thereafter decide which route to send these packets on.
S
Scalability
The ability of a software program to continue to function smoothly as additional volume, or work is required of it.
Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is a transaction security standard that provides data encryption, server authentication, and message integrity. SSL is usually used on sites that accept credit card numbers or other private information. You purchase a Secure Certificate for your domain, which is then installed on the web server that is hosting your site's secure pages.
Secure Shell
Secure Shell, or SSH, is a UNIX-based command interface and protocol for securely accessing a remote computer. It is frequently used as a secure method to remotely access and manipulate files directly on a web site.
Sender ID
Sender ID is an authentication protocol used to verify that the originating IP address is authorized to send email for the domain name declared in the visible "From" or "Sender" lines of the email message. Sender ID is used to prevent spoofing and to identify messages with visible domain names that have been forged.
Sender Policy Framework (SPF)
An authentication protocol used by recipient sites to verify that the originating IP address is authorized to send email for the domain name declared in the "MAIL FROM" line of the mail envelope. SPF is used to identify messages with forged "MAIL FROM" addresses.
Server
A program that acts as a central information source and provides services to programs in the same or other computers. The term can either refer to a particular piece of software, such as a WWW server, or to the machine on which the software is running.
Shareware
This term refers to software available on public networks.
Signature File
A short text file that email users can automatically append at the end of each message they send. Commonly, signature files list the user's name, phone number, company, company URL, etc.
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
A protocol used to send email on the Internet. SMTP is a set of rules regarding the interaction between a program sending email and a program receiving email.
SMTP
SMTP is the protocol used for sending email over the Internet. SMTP is a set of rules regarding the interaction between a program sending email and a program receiving email.
Snail Mail
Traditional or surface mail sent through postal services such as the USPS.
Sniffing
A method of determining whether email recipients are capable of receiving HTML-formatted messages. This procedure is not recommended as it is flawed and may result in inaccurate findings.
Soft Bounces
Email messages that cannot be delivered to the recipient because of a temporary error, such as a full mailbox.
Spam
Also known as unsolicited commercial email, spam is unwanted, unsolicited junk email sent to a large number of recipients.
SPF (Sender Policy Framework)
An authentication protocol used by recipient sites to verify that the originating IP address is authorized to send email for the domain name declared in the "MAIL FROM" line of the mail envelope. SPF is used to identify messages with forged "MAIL FROM" addresses.
Spoofing
The disreputable and often illegal act of falsifying the sender email address to make it appear as if an email message came from somewhere else.
Streaming Media
Audio and video files transmitted on the Internet in a continuous fashion.
Subject Line
The part of an email message where senders can type what the email message is about. Subject lines are considered important by email marketers because they can often influence whether a recipient will open an email message.
T
Targeting
Using demographics and related information in a customer database to select the most appropriate recipients for a specific email campaign
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol)
This is the protocol that defines the Internet. TCP/IP was originally designed for the unix operating system, but is today available for every major kind of computer operating system.
Top-Level Domains
There are two types of top-level domains: generic and country code. Generic domains were created for use by the public while country-code domains were intended for use by individual countries.
Tracking
In an email marketing campaign, measuring behavioral activities such as click-throughs and open-ups.
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
This is the protocol that defines the Internet. TCP / IP was originally designed for the unix operating system, but is today available for every major kind of computer operating system.
U
URL (Uniform Resource Locator)
The address of a file or Web page accessible on the Internet (for example, http://www.webhelps.com).
Uniform Resource Locator (URL)
The address of a file or Web page accessible on the Internet (for example, http://www.webhelps.com).
User Interface
A set of controls such as buttons, commands and other devices that allow a user to operate a computer program.
V
Viral marketing
A marketing strategy that encourages email recipients to pass along messages to others in order to generate additional exposure.
Virtual Hosting
A Web server hosting service that replaces a company's need to purchase and maintain its own Web server and connections to the Internet.
Virus
A program, macro or fragment of code that causes damage and can be quickly spread through Web sites or email.
W
WebMail
WebMail, in general, is an email program that is used with a web browser. It allows you to send/receive email using any computer that is connected to the Internet. [WebMail Help]
Web Storage/Space
Web Storage or Web Space indicates the amount of space on the web server available to store your web pages, images, and other web site files.
Whitelist
A whitelist is a list of email addresses, domain names, or IP addresses from which a spam blocking program will allow messages to be received, regardless of the content of the messages. All mail coming from the whitelisted address, domain, or IP is delivered, even if it is spam.
Worm
Malicious code that is often spread through an executable attachment in an email message.
X
XML (Extensible Markup Language)
A flexible way to create standard information formats and share both the format and the data on the World Wide Web.
Y
Z
Help Center  |   About Us  |   Privacy Policy  |   Glossary  |   Extreme Support  |   Legal
Copyright © 2000-2013 WhatHelps?, Inc. All rights reserved.